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Let your Personality Guide your Fitness

Over the years I’ve dealt with probably several hundred people and helped guide them towards their fitness goals.  What many people don’t know is that my background is in psychology, and I’m fascinated with how people think.

One aspect of goal setting that many people forget about when it comes to creating a goal is really digging deep into their personality type.  We all have different aspects to our personality depending on several factors.  These personality traits can either set you up for success in life or take away from it because you’ll always feel like you’re forcing a square peg into a round hole if you don’t.

As an example, three years ago I was offered an office job temporarily during the federal election.  I found quickly after a couple of weeks that sitting at a desk all day in an office environment made me want to dig my eyes out of my head with a rusty fork.  The work was easy for me, but I much prefer being on my feet, teaching and coaching different situations and people and having a fluid schedule.  This is just part of who I am.  The temporary job just reinforced it to me.

As an aside, I’ve never understood people who are miserable at their jobs just to take a paycheck home.  If you don’t like your situation, just change it – it’s not as hard as you think.  But I digress…

So how does this apply to fitness?  There’s a few ways you can analyze your personality and make it work for you fitness wise as well.  Here’s a couple of key questions to ask yourself when it comes to creating a strategy towards fitness:

Are you a Group Person or an Individual? 

What sports did you play as a kid?  Were you a hockey or basketball star or did you prefer golf or racquet sports?  Most people are either team sports oriented or individual sport oriented.  Someone who is team sport oriented likes meshing with and depending on other people to perform their activity.  An individual person might be part of a team still, but prefer that their performance relies on their own effort and skill.

This tends to also work in adulthood.  Individual sport people usually will prefer the same environment.   This might mean you join a running group, golf with a couple of others, play a racquet sport or cycle alone.  Team sport people will be more likely to join a league or team for things that require multiple people.

Let’s translate that to the gym.  An individual person likely would prefer something like simply lifting weights alone – even at home.  They don’t have to have another person relying on them to get things done.  A team person would likely prefer showing up to a yoga class with a bunch of people they know or doing anything with a bunch of others.

odd one out 2

Can you Focus or are you a Multi-Tasker? 

Some people can sit down and complete a grueling task that takes all day and enjoy it, checking off a list one thing at a time.  Others (like me) prefer constant changes and stimulation and can have several projects on the go at the same time.

The former person will prefer to walk into a gym with a defined plan.  Something to follow and check off parts as they go and likely not adjust it.  The latter will be more of a type that will adjust a plan on the fly if they have one, or try different types of classes in the same week for variety even if they might not be guiding towards anything specific.

A focused person would set one or two goals in a year and work diligently towards them like a marathon or a large event like a tournament or championship.  A multi-tasker might have ten goals and only accomplish five of them and be fine with that.

Your most successful champion athletes are typically the focused ones who can work on one goal for long periods of time and follow a plan – but it’s okay to admit that you aren’t that type of person.  If you find that you can’t follow a focused plan for more than a couple of months, admit that to yourself and find a way to tweak things so that you are working on a couple of things at once.  Triathletes are excellent multi-taskers (which is probably why I liked it too!).

Image result for focus vs multitasking

Do you Want to Show Off or are you Self-Fulfilled? 

This is where I might get criticized a bit but hear me out.  We all have a certain amount of narcissism within us.  Some more than others.  When you are digging deep you really need to ask yourself if you’re doing the event to be able to brag to your friends or show off to others, or simply for accomplishing a goal and feeling good about it yourself.

Making an amazing golf shot brings a good feeling to people – but you’re by yourself, as does making an amazing play on a soccer field so people will cheer for you.  Ask yourself if you don’t care about a trophy but want to have an amazing sense of accomplishment like a long adventure race or a marathon – or if you want to be carried off the field on the shoulders of your team mates or have your picture in a magazine so you can display it all over social media.

Again, how does this translate to the gym?  Maybe someone who wants to show their skills would be a great group fitness instructor.  Or join a Crossfit gym where they can write their accomplishments on a board and have people cheering them on at competitions.  Self-fulfilled people might not even need a gym and be happy just working out at home.

Image result for crossfit podium finish

Ask Yourself These Questions    

This process will go a long way towards making sure that you are doing something that you will continue with in the fitness world.  As we all know, the key to success is one main thing – consistency.  Creating an environment where you will feel your best and keep going constantly will bring you the greatest success with your goals.

Be honest with yourself as well.  It is easy to program things based on what we think others might think of us.  Get over it.  Focus on what you enjoy and really stay true to yourself – and this can apply to many areas of life, not just fitness.

If you have any questions or enjoyed this please like, share and retweet away!  I appreciate any and all feedback and hope that you continue in the best way towards your fitness journey.

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What Did You Accomplish This Year?

A pretty simple concept post this week for my readers.  Often when I’m dealing with clients I find one of the most important things for them is to get them to think long term, ie set annual goals and stick to them consistently throughout a calendar year.

We also tend to not give ourselves enough credit.  It’s so easy to think of what you haven’t got versus what you have.  If you’re healthier, fitter and most important happier at the end of the year, you’ve really won most of the battle.

So if you’re reading this post, I want you to think back to January of 2015.  You can even check your social media to see where you were at (one of the perks of it).  People today simply don’t think long term and then don’t give themselves proper credit for things they have actually accomplished.  One of my main goals in life (and hopefully yours too) is to always be pushing forward and trying to improve personally and professionally.

Here’s some examples from my own list, and I’ll also share some accomplishments I feel I had with some of my clients without naming any names.

  • Managed to correct a woman’s misdiagnosed tennis elbow in about thirty minutes applying common sense.
  • Allowed a client to bike in the mountains, which was a huge life goal for her after years of chronic pain and immobility.
  • Allowed a woman who had chronic fibromyalgia to experience pain free days for the first time in eight years.
  • Was able to successfully rehabilitate a tibial plateau fracture to the point where the client can now run, jump and play sports (something she was told she shouldn’t do ever again).
  • Took a running client to a 13 minute marathon personal best.
  • Dealt with a couple of very rare conditions (I won’t get into details here) but they have really allowed me to increase my level of care and knowledge.
  • Have managed to get several people into the best shape of their lives at a fairly advanced age and dealing with chronic hip, back and neck issues.

On a personal level:

  • Welcomed my second daughter into the world who is a busy little bug and now that she can move around gets into anything and everything. She’s going to be an athlete for sure.
  • Began working on my first course and book, to be fleshed out and hopefully presented for the first time in 2016.
  • My band has taken off and I’m much more comfortable behind the microphone by far – check out getoffmylawn.rocks if you want to check us out or book a show.
  • Currently symptom free from my previous heart condition and hoping that remains the same.
  • I weigh exactly the same as I did twenty years ago.

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So when you look back on your year, give yourself a pat on the back for what you have accomplished, no matter how small and insignificant it might seem.  Then sit down and put together some goals for next year.

Think back on what you have done to mold the future and what you want to be.  The best way to do this is to set some really high standards and do your best to meet them.  Even if you don’t, by the time the end of next year rolls around you might be really surprised at what you have done versus what you haven’t.

If you want to share any of your upcoming goals, I’d love to hear what they are!  Feel free to spread this around on social media and maybe we can start a trend of goal planning.  Until 2016, I am so grateful for all of my loyal readers, friends and clients and next year will just bring bigger and better things!

How to Keep Resolutioners in the Gym

I know this might be a bit early, but in three weeks it is 2016 and a whole new set of people will be undertaking new fitness goals.  The first thing I need to mention is that in the fitness world there tends to be a lot of elitism, and I’ve already seen the “resolutionist” memes going around Facebook.  The fact we even have a nickname for new exercisers says it all.

With society the way it is and a massive obesity epidemic, we should all play our own part in not only helping these people get into fitness, but keeping them around as long as possible.  See – you’ve already swallowed the pill of fitness, but you are in the vast minority.  Over half the population doesn’t exercise at all, and only about 10% regularly (meaning 3x a week and sustained for over six months) because it just isn’t on their radar and never has been.  But something is going to drive them into a gym (besides marketing hype) very soon.  And for some reason many of them stop after a few weeks.

I want to keep them there.  I want to have thousands of people NOT stop working out after six weeks and get healthier.  Then hopefully some of those people can inspire others to get started, and snowball effect takes place and boom, no more obesity.  Pipe dream?  Maybe.  But we can all do our part to help keep as many around as possible.

So here’s a list of ways as “fitness people” we can all help make sure that whomever you know who is getting started stays at it long term and gets to the state that you’re in:  loving exercise and feeling a ton better.

Gym-Newbie

STOP GIVING ADVICE AND GIVE SUPPORT INSTEAD

Your friend/co-worker/spouse knows you’re a fitness person.  It’s probably obvious when you talk about what you did on the weekend or take off your jacket.  Our instinct as soon as someone outside of our world wants to jump in is to tell them what worked for us, which simply may not be what would motivate or work for that person.  Don’t tell them to start running five times a week for weight loss, or start deadlifting like you do.  They are likely getting it from multiple sources and it can be not only confusing but overwhelming.  People don’t change overnight.

The simplest thing is to say “awesome news!” and if they ask questions tell them what worked for you, but also let them know what you went through in order to arrive at that conclusion.  Hopefully they will figure out something for themselves.  If they went to the gym that morning, give them a high five and leave it at that.  Let them know that it took you as a fitness person a long time to get to where you’re at and if they want to get support, you’re there but don’t overdo it.

And please don’t suddenly become a personal trainer and offer to work out with them and show them everything you do.  Swallow your pride and tell them if they need it to hire a professional.  You probably did too.

ASK WHAT THEIR ANNUAL GOAL IS

Typically the first few weeks as a new exerciser is confusing and tough.  It is a new thing to fit into your schedule, you have no idea what you’re doing and are nervous every time you step into a facility.  As a method of support, ask them where they want to be at the end of the YEAR.  Not next month.  Again, I’m trying to reinforce the long term aspect of this for sustainability.

Another way to motivate them might be “you know, I signed up for a Spartan Race in June – you should think about it” or “Hey, I’m thinking about doing the Army ½ marathon in September so I started training for the 10k in May”.  Let them know how long it takes to achieve things.  By next Christmas, where do they want to be?  With any luck it will trigger the need to sustain what they are doing.

INTRODUCE THEM TO YOUR SUPPORT NETWORK

We all have one.  Maybe you have a trainer you really like and have gotten great results from.  Maybe you get amazing recipes from a web site you love.  Maybe you subscribe to a message board you got a lot of support from.  Maybe they could sub in on your winter ultimate team and see how much fun group sports can be.  Introduce them to someone they see you talking to at the gym.

One of the hardest things any person can do is walk into a gym for the first time, and if they approach you and just need a friendly face, don’t get upset that they interrupted your third set of squats.  Take a longer rest break and chat for a bit, even if you’re there to work hard.  It won’t kill you or your gains.

SHOW THEM WHAT OPTIONS THERE ARE

Some people just aren’t gym people, and that’s fine.  The world of health literally has unlimited options.  I have a client whose husband is a World Champion in Skijoring, which is like sled dogging on a bicycle and sounds totally awesome (and I had never heard of it).  Whether it’s pole dancing, skating, weightlifting or aquafit, the fact that people are moving at all is really great.

So maybe your person seems to feel like the gym isn’t for them.  You probably have a friend who does something else cool that you can tell them about.  Even as kids we all either played individual or team sports and that rarely changes as an adult.  Ultimate Frisbee might not work, but then racquet sports might.  Plus the challenge of learning something new is always fun.

PLAY NICE IN THE SANDBOX

This final one is for all of the people who complain about the “clutter” in the gym in January.  Instead of thinking that “these people” are doing something wrong, change your attitude.  Smile at them.  Offer to let them work in on whatever you are using.  If you see someone looking lost offer to help them.  Be nice.  Once, you were probably that person (I know I was).

Remember, these people are probably watching everything you are doing because you’re the fitness person and they want to get there.  Being nice to newcomers can go a long way in getting them to stick around and feel like part of a community.  CrossFit boxes are fantastic at this because they are usually totally inclusionary and that’s how they retain people.  And those people make progress, at least far more than they would on the couch at home.

Sometimes a simple “hey, are you new here” and an offer to help can go a long way.  Be nice.

quits

If you liked this, please share it around and take it to heart.  I’m not just writing this for fitness people, by the way.  If you are thinking about stepping into a gym for the first time, please don’t be intimidated.  There is a world of options out there and a lot of really good people and support for you.

My other advice is also don’t wait until January and just get started now, but that’s a whole other article.

Feel free to follow, share and like this and until next time make sure if you see someone in January you help them out!

The Downers of the Downward Dog

This was inspired by a client of mine who wanted to restart yoga after a bad back injury.

What if, as a trainer I told you that we were going to do an exercise that did the following:

I want you to lengthen out your posterior chain as much as you can, throw both of your shoulders into extreme extension, put yourself into spinal flexion (even if you can’t properly tilt your pelvis) and stretch out your hamstrings and calves as far as they can go (thereby also yanking hard on your sciatic nerves) – oh, and do it while loaded with up to 70% of your body weight, and the load increases the further you get into the exercise.  So for a 150 pound female that would mean their shoulders and knees are loaded in extension with up to 105 pounds on their spine and other joints.

Does that sound like a good idea for anyone, let alone people recovering from injury?

The funny thing is, people in yoga classes do this almost every day.  It’s called a downward dog.

downward-dog-technique1

Now, before the yoga community absolutely freaks out and starts thinking I’m bashing the movement, I’m not.  All I’m doing is providing a practical analysis of what people are required to perform to get into this position.  I’ve had a client recently with severe back issues try to get back into yoga and the one movement she had immense trouble with (not surprisingly) was this one.   I’ve also attended yoga courses where thankfully the instructors were aware of the limitations of this movement and realized that not everyone should perform a downward dog – in fact several of my most respected colleagues actively discourage it since they have realized what it does.

On the flipside I’ve also been to yoga classes where the instructors did absolutely NOTHING except for sun salutations over and over again.  You can guess which class I didn’t go back to.

BKS Iyengar, one of the foremost yoga teachers in the world asserts that this asana stretches the shoulders, legs, spine and whole body; builds |strength throughout the body, particularly the arms, legs, and feet; relieves |fatigue and rejuvenates the body; improves the immune system, digestion and blood flow to the sinuses, and calms the mind and lifts the spirits.”  (ripped from Wikipedia) – and it does all of these things.

But what people need to realize as a whole is that some movements that you perform in a typical yoga class are very hard forceful strength movements.  Simply because it is packaged as something healthy and therapeutic doesn’t mean that it is.  Just like any other type of exercise, it needs to be tailored to the person participating in it.  A 200 pound deconditioned person has absolutely no business getting into this position and here’s why:

Here’s what people need to be able to do into order to successfully perform this movement:

Put your arms overhead fully or even behind the torso while internally rotated.  This requires a healthy rotator cuff complex, the rib cage to be able to move and the shoulder blade to be able to move with proper rhythm.  One loaded movement I often have clients do to test this area is a loaded shoulder extension (think a front raise but over the head with a cable) at various angles in order to engage the entire shoulder complex.

Hinge the hips with proper pelvic movement so that the lower spine isn’t flexed forward putting strain on the lower spine with load – while it’s flexed.  Think loaded Romanian deadlifts, and even things like good mornings (I have a bias against these because of where the load is placed but whatever).  Just because your hands and feet are on the floor doesn’t mean there isn’t a ton of pressure going through the lower spine in this position.

Fully extend the knees and dorsiflex the ankles as much as possible – general limits here are thought to be 30 degrees but most people have much, much less than that.  Generally here in a squatting position I look for the ability of the knee to travel forward properly and therefore dorsiflex the ankle.  Can you squat low?  Or does your person have longer legs relative to their torso?  Are they recovering from a knee issue that might be contraindicated to full knee extension (like a meniscus injury?).

There can be many restrictions in this area and it also has the highest risk of issue due to the excessive load people will put on their knees in order to force themselves into a straight legged position.  The restriction might also come from hamstrings, calves or somewhere else, not even the ankle.

So here’s my question:  Can or should you do all of these things and hold them for time?  No?  Maybe this movement isn’t for you.

What people need to realize is that even though it is relaxation based and supposedly “stretching”, yoga is still force on joints.  Sometimes a lot of it.  Another common flaw of the downward dog is that people will generally run away from weakness.  This means that if they are weaker in the shoulders and have trouble there they will dump more load into their lower body in this position.  If they are weaker in the lower half they may dump more load into their upper body.  I have seen this often in classes.  And it can cause a serious problem if suddenly the load shifts by 20-30% into the wrong area suddenly due to a weakness somewhere else.  However, due to the nature of the position there isn’t any way to get out of it.  Except for compromising by say, lifting your heels or bending the knees or even elbows to put load elsewhere.

So what are some good modifications?  Well, like in any other loaded position if you can take the load off a bit, then the person can attempt the range of motion without the excessive joint force.  For example, a person with good shoulder mobility but poor posterior chain range and pelvic movement might want to perform a simple hip hinge with their shoulders extended and brace their upper body against something.  Prenatal classes often recommend this.

modified_downdog-600x396

Another option might be to intentionally elevate the heels and bend the knees as I expressed earlier.  You can also bend only one knee or alternate sides.  For less force on the arms and shoulders, lower the body and rest the forearms on the ground.  These are all modifications that can easily be suggested in a class but often aren’t.  During a busy class most instructors just don’t have the chance to go around and suggest individual modifications to people.

Or here’s a thought – don’t do it.  There are ways to work up to this movement, just like any other yoga movements but so many people make the mistake of jumping in and following along, and then wonder why they are sore the next day and never want to go back.

The good news is that with my modifications to her positions and telling her to skip downward dogs my client successfully navigated two yoga classes and has been able to get back in touch with something she previously enjoyed but couldn’t do.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m a fan of yoga.  I’m a fan of anything that keeps people moving, enjoying loaded positions to develop strength and will over time develop additional range of motion.  I’m also a big fan of the relaxation side of the practice and allowing people to be in a parasympathetic state, even if it is only for five minutes at the end of class in savasana.  It’s something most people should do a lot more of.  The reason I’m writing this is to make sure that if you are about to jump back into yoga because you think it is a good way to ease into exercise again – it might not be depending on the class.

As always, if you have comments feel free to comment here or email me at paradigmfitnessottawa@gmail.com.  Good luck with your future practices!