Tagged: yoga

Let your Personality Guide your Fitness

Over the years I’ve dealt with probably several hundred people and helped guide them towards their fitness goals.  What many people don’t know is that my background is in psychology, and I’m fascinated with how people think.

One aspect of goal setting that many people forget about when it comes to creating a goal is really digging deep into their personality type.  We all have different aspects to our personality depending on several factors.  These personality traits can either set you up for success in life or take away from it because you’ll always feel like you’re forcing a square peg into a round hole if you don’t.

As an example, three years ago I was offered an office job temporarily during the federal election.  I found quickly after a couple of weeks that sitting at a desk all day in an office environment made me want to dig my eyes out of my head with a rusty fork.  The work was easy for me, but I much prefer being on my feet, teaching and coaching different situations and people and having a fluid schedule.  This is just part of who I am.  The temporary job just reinforced it to me.

As an aside, I’ve never understood people who are miserable at their jobs just to take a paycheck home.  If you don’t like your situation, just change it – it’s not as hard as you think.  But I digress…

So how does this apply to fitness?  There’s a few ways you can analyze your personality and make it work for you fitness wise as well.  Here’s a couple of key questions to ask yourself when it comes to creating a strategy towards fitness:

Are you a Group Person or an Individual? 

What sports did you play as a kid?  Were you a hockey or basketball star or did you prefer golf or racquet sports?  Most people are either team sports oriented or individual sport oriented.  Someone who is team sport oriented likes meshing with and depending on other people to perform their activity.  An individual person might be part of a team still, but prefer that their performance relies on their own effort and skill.

This tends to also work in adulthood.  Individual sport people usually will prefer the same environment.   This might mean you join a running group, golf with a couple of others, play a racquet sport or cycle alone.  Team sport people will be more likely to join a league or team for things that require multiple people.

Let’s translate that to the gym.  An individual person likely would prefer something like simply lifting weights alone – even at home.  They don’t have to have another person relying on them to get things done.  A team person would likely prefer showing up to a yoga class with a bunch of people they know or doing anything with a bunch of others.

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Can you Focus or are you a Multi-Tasker? 

Some people can sit down and complete a grueling task that takes all day and enjoy it, checking off a list one thing at a time.  Others (like me) prefer constant changes and stimulation and can have several projects on the go at the same time.

The former person will prefer to walk into a gym with a defined plan.  Something to follow and check off parts as they go and likely not adjust it.  The latter will be more of a type that will adjust a plan on the fly if they have one, or try different types of classes in the same week for variety even if they might not be guiding towards anything specific.

A focused person would set one or two goals in a year and work diligently towards them like a marathon or a large event like a tournament or championship.  A multi-tasker might have ten goals and only accomplish five of them and be fine with that.

Your most successful champion athletes are typically the focused ones who can work on one goal for long periods of time and follow a plan – but it’s okay to admit that you aren’t that type of person.  If you find that you can’t follow a focused plan for more than a couple of months, admit that to yourself and find a way to tweak things so that you are working on a couple of things at once.  Triathletes are excellent multi-taskers (which is probably why I liked it too!).

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Do you Want to Show Off or are you Self-Fulfilled? 

This is where I might get criticized a bit but hear me out.  We all have a certain amount of narcissism within us.  Some more than others.  When you are digging deep you really need to ask yourself if you’re doing the event to be able to brag to your friends or show off to others, or simply for accomplishing a goal and feeling good about it yourself.

Making an amazing golf shot brings a good feeling to people – but you’re by yourself, as does making an amazing play on a soccer field so people will cheer for you.  Ask yourself if you don’t care about a trophy but want to have an amazing sense of accomplishment like a long adventure race or a marathon – or if you want to be carried off the field on the shoulders of your team mates or have your picture in a magazine so you can display it all over social media.

Again, how does this translate to the gym?  Maybe someone who wants to show their skills would be a great group fitness instructor.  Or join a Crossfit gym where they can write their accomplishments on a board and have people cheering them on at competitions.  Self-fulfilled people might not even need a gym and be happy just working out at home.

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Ask Yourself These Questions    

This process will go a long way towards making sure that you are doing something that you will continue with in the fitness world.  As we all know, the key to success is one main thing – consistency.  Creating an environment where you will feel your best and keep going constantly will bring you the greatest success with your goals.

Be honest with yourself as well.  It is easy to program things based on what we think others might think of us.  Get over it.  Focus on what you enjoy and really stay true to yourself – and this can apply to many areas of life, not just fitness.

If you have any questions or enjoyed this please like, share and retweet away!  I appreciate any and all feedback and hope that you continue in the best way towards your fitness journey.

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Rules of the Body

Jill Miller, who is the inventor of a program called Yoga Tune Up, recently revealed on her blog about a month ago that she needs a total hip replacement.  At the age of 45.  Now, she has been absolutely instrumental in helping many, many people discover a modality that can really help irritated tissue and brought it to the main stream.  The story, however is what I want to bring your attention to today.

What was telling about her first blog post, which you can find HERE (and I’ll link to the second part HERE) is that she felt nagging pain not only for most of her life but for the past seven years.  Until recently she didn’t bother to have it looked at because she was worried about surgery for personal reasons.  That’s fine.

This is one of the most respected and knowledgeable (from an anatomy standpoint) body teachers IN THE WORLD and even she ignored her symptoms.  We all do it, from your fellow office worker to high level athletes who want to keep competing.

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This is all too common with athletes.

“I’m okay, I just need to stretch.”  “I’ll start using my therapy ball.”  “I’ll take a couple of weeks off from running and everything will be fine.”  And then we go back to doing the same thing that caused the problem in the first place and are suddenly surprised when the issue comes back – and worse.

Just this week another client of mine’s husband after almost a year of pain finally decided to go to the doctor and get checked because his knee wouldn’t stop failing and buckling.  My prediction is either a torn ACL or a severely torn meniscus (or both).  The problem is that he’s been walking around on it for the better part of a year without any treatment or attention, and likely it’s gotten a lot worse.  This might mean that something that could have been helped with therapy before might need surgery now.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again:

Your body isn’t stupid.

Pain, collapse, restricted range is a signal that something is wrong.

The sooner you figure it out and fix it the better off long term you will be.

If you have water coming into your basement, you figure out where it is coming from and plug the leak.  You don’t sit there and wait for it to subside, clean it up and then wait for it to happen again.  Mold sets in.  The leak might get bigger.  Other things can come into play that make a simple leak a catastrophe.  Your body is no different.

When your body is subjected to stress, it responds to it.  This can result in either stronger muscles, or deterioration and loss of integrity.  A large part of my job is finding out the perfect balance between just enough and too much load, stress or torque on joints.  You need to consider your body as a whole and what loads it is being subjected to daily, weekly and annually to really figure this out.

And in case you’re wondering, sitting is a load.  Driving is a load.  Weight training is a load.  Yoga is a load.  I remember when I sat through the Yoga Tune Up course (I did not certify because I have no desire to be a yoga instructor) and a room full of body practitioners looked at me like I had two heads when I suggested that yoga poses – especially extreme ones – are still heavy forces through joints.  They are, in case you’re wondering.  Jill Miller says that herself in her articles.  Years ago I wrote a post about why a downward dog is downright dangerous for most people.  It’s HERE.

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Is this good for your hip socket?

One big fundamental rule I teach my clients is that they should walk out of a workout feeling better – not worse.  This means they are far more likely to have had an appropriate level of stimulus and will have a better long-term response.  They won’t get worse, they will get better.  Isn’t that the whole idea?

The point of this is that nobody is invulnerable to the rules of the body, even people who have spent their whole life practicing something that is supposedly therapeutic.  Don’t assume that if you have a problem that things like stretching and pounding yourself with a yoga ball is the answer.  It might just make things worse over time.  Seek out someone who knows the rules of the body and can identify a proper strategy to bring your body back into balance and stop overloading tissue.

So the next time you work out, try taking a step back.  Are you pushing through pain?  Have you had a problem for a while and have been ignoring it?  Take a really close stock and tell yourself that you should probably get that taken care of before subjecting your body to even more stress.

Because nobody wants a hip replacement at the age of 45.  At least I don’t.

Feel free to message me or find me on social media if you have something you would like to identify or a question.  Injuries and providing solutions are what I deal with every day.

Does Your Back Hurt? Part 3

Finally the finishing touches to my back pain series.  This was prompted by the epidemic of back issues that have been posted all over my social media lately.  It seems that this winter many people have decided to “throw out” their backs.  And this is something that is completely avoidable.  The problem lies in that you’ve already likely done it to yourself.  Now we have to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.

In July I wrote two articles on back pain.  The first one which you can find here was about identifying what and why back pain typically occurs.  The second one, which you can find here was about movements you can use when you’re feeling stiff or sore to help provide relief for general stiffness and soreness.

This part is about the exercises.  Now, most therapists and trainers would identify that you need “more core strength”.  What does that actually mean?  Many people will think that yoga, pilates or even just simple crunches will do the trick.  As I said in Part Two, the “core” is a very complex thing and can’t be isolated into one or two muscles.  You have to strengthen the entire complex, and this stretches from the pelvis all the way up to the shoulders and even down into the legs.

So how do you begin?  Well, a good place to start is by working on movements that you have to perform daily anyway.

My number one exercise to develop and improve back strength and resolve symptoms of back pain:  The Deadlift.  

In fact, if you were only allowed to do one exercise for the rest of your life, this would probably be my first recommendation.

kettlebell-deadlift

Pretty simple, right?  Picking something up and putting it down.  This is not actually true. There is a lot of proper technique and intention behind this movement and I strongly suggest you have a competent coach (not your “brother-in-law who lifts”) teach you the movement and all of its’ parts.  It includes the ability to squat, hip hinge and also keep your spine engaged throughout the movement, all individual components that you need to be aware of.

The good thing about this exercise is that it can be regressed so that my 103 year gold Grammie can do it, or progressed to an Olympic lifting level.  It is very versatile and hits most of the muscles in your body in a very good way.  One of my goals with any of my clients (even those with compromised backs) is a good solid deadlift.

My second choice for back strength actually involves the hips more than anything.  Strong hips (and you can feel free to think “glutes” here) are essential for spinal integrity.  Therefore my number two is:  Hip Thrusters.

hip-thrust

Now, this can be an uncomfortable position for many so I typically suggest starting this movement on the floor, then progressing to a Swiss Ball for mild loads, then a bench or modified floor position for heavier ones.  You also need to make sure that your legs are in the proper position and you can actually hinge at the hips before you can do this properly.  Again, please consult a professional coach to help give you the right technique.

Easy regression is an isometric hold in the up position (on the floor or a mat) for 15-20 seconds to start.  Focus on pushing through the heels and pretending you’re holding a pencil between your butt cheeks and not letting it go.

Now, we also need a movement that takes place in the frontal plane – which means up and down if you’re standing up.  This makes sure that the spine is being trained with forces that it will experience frequently.  One way that people frequently hurt their backs is by extending a load over their heads they have no business lifting.

Most people also have very little upper body strength in relation to their lower body or vice versa.  Men are horrible at this because they want to have a big upper body and never make their legs strong so their poor spine is like a pipe cleaner balanced with a big rock on top of it – and easily collapsed.

Therefore my next exercise for proper back health is very simple: The Pull-Up.

I realize that most people can’t do one full pull-up properly.  Therefore I’ve given you two pictures that show easy ways to do these assisted in a gym or at home.  If you need more ideas feel free to email me or google it and you’ll find a few more.  I have at home clients do this with a bed sheet and a door frame sitting on the ground.

This movement not only is great for loading your spine in a frontal plane, it also hits those often neglected upper body pulling muscles that don’t get a lot of use.  I encourage all of my clients to get to the stage where they can do pull-ups without much assistance.  There are also a variety of choices in terms of grips and adjustments to enhance the strength in your shoulders without wrecking them.  Please be careful and progress things appropriately.

Oh, and yes there is some debate over whether this is a frontal or sagittal plane movement.  I believe it is a frontal plane movement.  If you want to debate it, feel free to call me out.

There is a long list of complimentary exercises that I would add to this list.  Some of them include:

  • Overhead Pressing
  • Romanian Deadlifts
  • Back Extensions and Reverse Back Extensions
  • Loaded Planking with movement
  • Lateral Side Flexion
  • Loaded Trunk Rotation
  • Split Squats

And the list can go on.  However, if you want to get started on the path to good spinal strength, these three are your first and best bet towards good spinal strength.

You might also notice that none of these first three exercises are traditional “core” exercises.  However, all of them load your spine quite nicely and give you the benefit of adding strength in a bunch of other places as well.  This is essential for total body health.

All of these exercises can be progressed and regressed by a competent coach.  Always remember that exercise is tailored to the individual, and a good coach will adjust your program based on need and result (and goal).

I’m planning on putting together a proper E-Book on Back Strength coming soon.  If you would like a free copy, feel free to subscribe to my site by adding yourself to the list at the side, or follow me on Twitter at @strengthottawa, Instagram at @strengthrehabottawa and on Facebook at Strength Rehabilitation Institute of Ottawa.  I’m also always interested in your thoughts and feedback, so feel free to Share this as well on any social media.

Take care of your backs!

How To Shovel Snow

The full title of this should be How To Shovel Snow (And Not Hurt Yourself).  We just had our first fairly serious snowfall in Ottawa and inevitably this brings on clients starting to shovel large amounts of the white stuff.

This also inevitably brings on back problems, shoulder problems and even knee problems from doing this seemingly simple activity.  If I told you to pick up a 20 pound weight, for most of you it isn’t a problem (especially if you work with me).  However, if I told you to pick it up, then throw it about five feet beside you while twisting, then repeat that about 200 times you might be a bit sore.  This is actually what you do when you’re shoveling snow, it’s just you don’t realize it.

Some simple physics:  The further something is away from you the heavier it is on your joints.  This is actually an exponential relationship, meaning if something is twice as far away, it is four times the load.  So my first basic thing is to have a compact shovel – the shorter handle you can manage the better.  However, this is sometimes a trade off for having to bend more, which we will get to in a second.  Having the right shovel in terms of size and length can help in the long run.

Tip #1:  The place people run into problems most while moving snow is that they tend to pick up a load, then twist and throw it.  Twisting under load makes your lower back extremely vulnerable, especially with a flexed spine (ie bent forward).  Position seem familiar?

snow-throw

Oh that feels so good on my back!

If you can pick up the load and throw it straight in front of you it lowers the impact on your back significantly.  Pushing it in front of you also works, using one of those large sled like shovels.  It may take some creative positioning but your back will thank you.

Tip #2: People have a dominant side, and feel more comfortable moving with that side.  My next tip is to switch sides frequently in order to give one side a rest.  You can do this with every 10 shovel loads, every 5 or whatever you like.  Make a system and use it.  Not only will this help your back, but it will also lower the impact on your shoulders and arms.  This usually means you can go for longer if you need to.  However, this isn’t always the best way to do things.

Tip #3:  If you’re not in fantastic shape and don’t have good cardiovascular health, take frequent breaks – even long ones.  The snow isn’t going anywhere (until April) so you have lots of time.  Lifting and repetitive movement is hugely anaerobic activity and can get your heart rate to dangerous levels for long periods of time (hence frequent heart attacks).  Keep your exertion levels in check.  If you need to, stop and take 2 minutes – is your heart rate back to below 60% of your maximum?  Then continue.  As you work harder, your body will take longer to recover from the exertion and if you find that your heart rate isn’t coming back down even after 5 minutes then stop the activity altogether and come back after a long break.  Don’t be a hero just because you want to get the driveway finished.  It’s hard work just like any other workout.

Tip #4:  To save your shoulders, try to keep your arms bent, especially when you have a loaded shovel and you’re lifting.  Having your arms extended puts most of the load directly on your shoulders and they usually aren’t strong enough to support it.  Again, imagine if I handed you a 20 pound bar and asked you to hold it straight out in front of you.  Your shoulders would think it was about 80 pounds.  If you simply bend your arms, and put some force into your biceps and wrists then the load is lessened to the shoulder significantly.

kid-shovel

He’s got the right idea – bent arms!

Tip #5:  Shovel more frequently if there is a large snowfall.  Doing it 2-3 times with a small amount is much better than trying to move 30 centimeters all at once.  So many people wait until the snowfall is over and then move a huge amount all at once, rather than moving 1/3 at a time 3 times.  Again, in terms of overall volume this will greatly reduce the potential for overload and therefore injury.  Better to lift half the amount more often than a larger load and increase risk of hurting yourself.

We here in Ottawa embrace winter (or at least we’re supposed to).  Don’t let something as simple as clearing your driveway be the reason you have to rehab a serious back injury or shoulder problem this holiday season.

If you enjoyed this article, please feel free to SHARE it on social media.  And, if you have a problem with your back or shoulders you need help with, feel free to contact me at strengthrehabottawa@gmail.com or on Twitter @strengthottawa or find me on Facebook here.

As a bonus, here’s my dog Woofie enjoying the snow!  Hope you have a great day!

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