Tagged: ottawa

An Update from the Institute

Wow, it has been about six months since I’ve posted a proper article on my site.  Due to lots of personal stuff and my business exploding in May time to sit down and write has been minimal at best.  I also have some exciting side projects that I have been working on, but I wanted to touch base with my readership and let you all know what is in the works.

First of all, for those of you who haven’t experienced it yet, ISOPHIT has become an integral part of my practice.  The results have been nothing short of amazing for providing new stable joints and allowing people who have limited range of motion to strengthen muscles without having to risk any issues.  I’m still offering FREE workouts on this apparatus if you want to experience it any time, just contact me.

I’m heading to Toronto in October to finally take the first part of the ISOPHIT certification program (I took the second part in April) and gain some more knowledge about the apparatus and how to apply it effectively.  It’s really a game changer.

The second part of the Joint Injury Management Series is almost completed!  Due to schedules I don’t know if I’ll be able to roll it out this year and may have to wait until next year to get it going, but that just means I can do it back to back with my initial course again on the knee.  This one focuses on the shoulder and will help fellow trainers and other therapists learn pathology and solutions for things like rotator cuff problems, labral tears, tennis elbow and more!

The third exciting thing is I’m finally putting together a short Ebook on total back care and recovery from back injury.  I’m excited to say that this offering will be FREE and will provide comprehensive information about your spinal health including recovery movements, strength movements and some things you can focus on to make sure back injury never comes back once it’s gone!

So essentially besides training my clients all the time I have a lot on the go.  If you have any interest in anything I’ve discussed please let me know and I’m happy to sign you up for updates and get you on my mailing list for the new Ebook and course offering.  Just click on the subscribe button at the top right!

And, as always you can follow me on Facebook and other social media outlets.

Just a quick update for today, but much, much more to come in the future from the Institute!

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Starting at the Beginning

Recently I took a course in NeuroKinetic Therapy, which was a great weekend of learning.  Not only did I get to experience a great new modality to help my clients but I found out some things about myself.

As practitioners we often overlook little flaws in what we do because we think we know everything.  My strength levels are good, my mobility is excellent and I have a great amount of power and endurance.  A funny thing happened though.

When I got my deep abdominal layer tested it was a MASSIVE fail in one area.  Having the humility to analyze that made me realize that I had to go back to the drawing board and rebuild what I had been working on for my own workouts.  And this meant going right back to some very basic exercises that I had been overlooking for years.

One of my roles as a coach is to remind people of basic fundamentals, and I spend a lot of my time during sessions doing just that.  Reminding people to slow down, focus on form, even adjusting loads constantly to create the ability to control muscles and joints.  More often than not my athletes have overlooked that if they can’t do A properly, then they have no business doing B.

So here’s the question I ask people – are you good enough at the simple fundamentals before you jump into more advanced things when it comes to your training?

beginning

I’ll give an example of my runners.  So many runners are notorious for simply strapping on their shoes and going out for runs without having strong lower limbs or backs and then wonder why they are constantly getting hurt.  My runners get trained like powerlifters in the gym because their bodies HAVE to be able to take a large amount of load constantly.  This means they need to be able to have strong backs and hips which means great form during heavy lifting.  Then, they need to be able to run short distance consistently day after day with good form and recovery principles in place before expanding their distance and speed.  This takes months for many of them, not days or weeks.

If your goal is to deadlift heavy weight, can you even get into lifting position (ie a fairly deep squat) without compromising your spine first?  Have you worked on basic position fundamentals enough to then be able to load the bar and try some controlled repetitions?Practice this first and make sure you have it down.

If your goal is to play a sport, can you do the basics like push hard anaerobically for 45 seconds without getting completely winded repeatedly and losing form during your movement?  No?  Maybe you need to focus on just doing hard repeats before getting back on the ice or track.

Or, if your goal is simply to get into a good exercise habit, can you perform some basic bodyweight movements – at home – for 10 minutes every other day and establish a habit before you even think about joining a gym?  This can also take weeks for some people.  And before you say an excuse, remember that it’s only 10 minutes.  Drop one episode of Netflix or don’t hit the snooze button.

If you have tried to change things in the past and keep going back, sometimes it takes a complete step back to the very start and beginning there again before you move forward.  for many this requires some humility, but if it will get you to your long term goal faster and without hurting yourself then it is worth the investment.  Nothing in life comes without some hard work over time, and this is usually months, not days or weeks.

stepback

So my lesson today is to take a look at your program and maybe take a step back if you’re not seeing progress or you have gotten out of a good habit.  Break down what you’re really trying to accomplish and begin with the simplest parts.  Once you have mastered that, then you have the right to move onto more difficult parts.

I’m already applying this to my own exercise practice and seeing improvement even after two weeks.  You can easily do the same.

By the way, this doesn’t have to apply to exercise only.  Whether it be work goals, life goals or even family goals starting with simple fundamentals is always the best course of action.

If you need help figuring out where to get started, I’m happy to help.  Reach our at strengthrehabottawa@gmail.com, on Facebook or on Twitter or Instagram @strengthottawa.  I look forward to the opportunity to help you move forward.

 

 

Does Your Back Hurt? Part 3

Finally the finishing touches to my back pain series.  This was prompted by the epidemic of back issues that have been posted all over my social media lately.  It seems that this winter many people have decided to “throw out” their backs.  And this is something that is completely avoidable.  The problem lies in that you’ve already likely done it to yourself.  Now we have to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.

In July I wrote two articles on back pain.  The first one which you can find here was about identifying what and why back pain typically occurs.  The second one, which you can find here was about movements you can use when you’re feeling stiff or sore to help provide relief for general stiffness and soreness.

This part is about the exercises.  Now, most therapists and trainers would identify that you need “more core strength”.  What does that actually mean?  Many people will think that yoga, pilates or even just simple crunches will do the trick.  As I said in Part Two, the “core” is a very complex thing and can’t be isolated into one or two muscles.  You have to strengthen the entire complex, and this stretches from the pelvis all the way up to the shoulders and even down into the legs.

So how do you begin?  Well, a good place to start is by working on movements that you have to perform daily anyway.

My number one exercise to develop and improve back strength and resolve symptoms of back pain:  The Deadlift.  

In fact, if you were only allowed to do one exercise for the rest of your life, this would probably be my first recommendation.

kettlebell-deadlift

Pretty simple, right?  Picking something up and putting it down.  This is not actually true. There is a lot of proper technique and intention behind this movement and I strongly suggest you have a competent coach (not your “brother-in-law who lifts”) teach you the movement and all of its’ parts.  It includes the ability to squat, hip hinge and also keep your spine engaged throughout the movement, all individual components that you need to be aware of.

The good thing about this exercise is that it can be regressed so that my 103 year gold Grammie can do it, or progressed to an Olympic lifting level.  It is very versatile and hits most of the muscles in your body in a very good way.  One of my goals with any of my clients (even those with compromised backs) is a good solid deadlift.

My second choice for back strength actually involves the hips more than anything.  Strong hips (and you can feel free to think “glutes” here) are essential for spinal integrity.  Therefore my number two is:  Hip Thrusters.

hip-thrust

Now, this can be an uncomfortable position for many so I typically suggest starting this movement on the floor, then progressing to a Swiss Ball for mild loads, then a bench or modified floor position for heavier ones.  You also need to make sure that your legs are in the proper position and you can actually hinge at the hips before you can do this properly.  Again, please consult a professional coach to help give you the right technique.

Easy regression is an isometric hold in the up position (on the floor or a mat) for 15-20 seconds to start.  Focus on pushing through the heels and pretending you’re holding a pencil between your butt cheeks and not letting it go.

Now, we also need a movement that takes place in the frontal plane – which means up and down if you’re standing up.  This makes sure that the spine is being trained with forces that it will experience frequently.  One way that people frequently hurt their backs is by extending a load over their heads they have no business lifting.

Most people also have very little upper body strength in relation to their lower body or vice versa.  Men are horrible at this because they want to have a big upper body and never make their legs strong so their poor spine is like a pipe cleaner balanced with a big rock on top of it – and easily collapsed.

Therefore my next exercise for proper back health is very simple: The Pull-Up.

I realize that most people can’t do one full pull-up properly.  Therefore I’ve given you two pictures that show easy ways to do these assisted in a gym or at home.  If you need more ideas feel free to email me or google it and you’ll find a few more.  I have at home clients do this with a bed sheet and a door frame sitting on the ground.

This movement not only is great for loading your spine in a frontal plane, it also hits those often neglected upper body pulling muscles that don’t get a lot of use.  I encourage all of my clients to get to the stage where they can do pull-ups without much assistance.  There are also a variety of choices in terms of grips and adjustments to enhance the strength in your shoulders without wrecking them.  Please be careful and progress things appropriately.

Oh, and yes there is some debate over whether this is a frontal or sagittal plane movement.  I believe it is a frontal plane movement.  If you want to debate it, feel free to call me out.

There is a long list of complimentary exercises that I would add to this list.  Some of them include:

  • Overhead Pressing
  • Romanian Deadlifts
  • Back Extensions and Reverse Back Extensions
  • Loaded Planking with movement
  • Lateral Side Flexion
  • Loaded Trunk Rotation
  • Split Squats

And the list can go on.  However, if you want to get started on the path to good spinal strength, these three are your first and best bet towards good spinal strength.

You might also notice that none of these first three exercises are traditional “core” exercises.  However, all of them load your spine quite nicely and give you the benefit of adding strength in a bunch of other places as well.  This is essential for total body health.

All of these exercises can be progressed and regressed by a competent coach.  Always remember that exercise is tailored to the individual, and a good coach will adjust your program based on need and result (and goal).

I’m planning on putting together a proper E-Book on Back Strength coming soon.  If you would like a free copy, feel free to subscribe to my site by adding yourself to the list at the side, or follow me on Twitter at @strengthottawa, Instagram at @strengthrehabottawa and on Facebook at Strength Rehabilitation Institute of Ottawa.  I’m also always interested in your thoughts and feedback, so feel free to Share this as well on any social media.

Take care of your backs!

How To Shovel Snow

The full title of this should be How To Shovel Snow (And Not Hurt Yourself).  We just had our first fairly serious snowfall in Ottawa and inevitably this brings on clients starting to shovel large amounts of the white stuff.

This also inevitably brings on back problems, shoulder problems and even knee problems from doing this seemingly simple activity.  If I told you to pick up a 20 pound weight, for most of you it isn’t a problem (especially if you work with me).  However, if I told you to pick it up, then throw it about five feet beside you while twisting, then repeat that about 200 times you might be a bit sore.  This is actually what you do when you’re shoveling snow, it’s just you don’t realize it.

Some simple physics:  The further something is away from you the heavier it is on your joints.  This is actually an exponential relationship, meaning if something is twice as far away, it is four times the load.  So my first basic thing is to have a compact shovel – the shorter handle you can manage the better.  However, this is sometimes a trade off for having to bend more, which we will get to in a second.  Having the right shovel in terms of size and length can help in the long run.

Tip #1:  The place people run into problems most while moving snow is that they tend to pick up a load, then twist and throw it.  Twisting under load makes your lower back extremely vulnerable, especially with a flexed spine (ie bent forward).  Position seem familiar?

snow-throw

Oh that feels so good on my back!

If you can pick up the load and throw it straight in front of you it lowers the impact on your back significantly.  Pushing it in front of you also works, using one of those large sled like shovels.  It may take some creative positioning but your back will thank you.

Tip #2: People have a dominant side, and feel more comfortable moving with that side.  My next tip is to switch sides frequently in order to give one side a rest.  You can do this with every 10 shovel loads, every 5 or whatever you like.  Make a system and use it.  Not only will this help your back, but it will also lower the impact on your shoulders and arms.  This usually means you can go for longer if you need to.  However, this isn’t always the best way to do things.

Tip #3:  If you’re not in fantastic shape and don’t have good cardiovascular health, take frequent breaks – even long ones.  The snow isn’t going anywhere (until April) so you have lots of time.  Lifting and repetitive movement is hugely anaerobic activity and can get your heart rate to dangerous levels for long periods of time (hence frequent heart attacks).  Keep your exertion levels in check.  If you need to, stop and take 2 minutes – is your heart rate back to below 60% of your maximum?  Then continue.  As you work harder, your body will take longer to recover from the exertion and if you find that your heart rate isn’t coming back down even after 5 minutes then stop the activity altogether and come back after a long break.  Don’t be a hero just because you want to get the driveway finished.  It’s hard work just like any other workout.

Tip #4:  To save your shoulders, try to keep your arms bent, especially when you have a loaded shovel and you’re lifting.  Having your arms extended puts most of the load directly on your shoulders and they usually aren’t strong enough to support it.  Again, imagine if I handed you a 20 pound bar and asked you to hold it straight out in front of you.  Your shoulders would think it was about 80 pounds.  If you simply bend your arms, and put some force into your biceps and wrists then the load is lessened to the shoulder significantly.

kid-shovel

He’s got the right idea – bent arms!

Tip #5:  Shovel more frequently if there is a large snowfall.  Doing it 2-3 times with a small amount is much better than trying to move 30 centimeters all at once.  So many people wait until the snowfall is over and then move a huge amount all at once, rather than moving 1/3 at a time 3 times.  Again, in terms of overall volume this will greatly reduce the potential for overload and therefore injury.  Better to lift half the amount more often than a larger load and increase risk of hurting yourself.

We here in Ottawa embrace winter (or at least we’re supposed to).  Don’t let something as simple as clearing your driveway be the reason you have to rehab a serious back injury or shoulder problem this holiday season.

If you enjoyed this article, please feel free to SHARE it on social media.  And, if you have a problem with your back or shoulders you need help with, feel free to contact me at strengthrehabottawa@gmail.com or on Twitter @strengthottawa or find me on Facebook here.

As a bonus, here’s my dog Woofie enjoying the snow!  Hope you have a great day!

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