Tagged: workout

The RAW Approach For Change

When most people think about changing their body, they think of weight loss. But there are a ton of other reasons that someone might want to create a change, both inside and out. Maybe you’re tired of lack of energy or your stomach feeling terrible. Maybe you’re tired of aches and pains when you kneel or bend over. Or maybe you want to see a different clothing size on your body. Whatever it is doesn’t matter.

All of these things require one thing – change. And this article is all about the direct but effective way to create that change so that it lasts for a lifetime. Are you the type of person that has tried several times to change something and can’t figure out why the things you want to create never stick? Perhaps this insight will help.

I’ve been coaching people for over two decades and have managed to help hundreds of people create positive change. Through careful observation, tons of examples and lots of practical application I feel like I have a pretty good grasp on what solid change takes.

So here’s the three things I’ve identified that break down the basics of what you need to think about. I’ve called it the RAW method for a reason. Part of it is that you have to really get into the raw details of what you want and what you’re currently doing. Here’s the list:

One: Recognize your Patterns

Humans are creatures of habit. We tend to do the same things pretty much daily, and when that routine becomes disruptive it is actually instinctual that it will cause some discomfort. Examples might be snacking in front of the television at the same point in the evening after the kids go to bed. Or right after work thinking about how nicely that glass of wine is going to feel, even if you know it might make your stomach feel terrible.

There can be positive patterns as well. A good bedtime routine. A good morning routine. Comforting yourself with a decent coffee in the morning which makes you feel good before work. Walking outside during your lunch hour. These things make us feel better, and we should also recognize that side of it.

When you wake up in the morning feeling amazing because of a good nights’ sleep, think about the positive things you did to create that feeling. It helps reinforce in your brain that it was a good thing rather than an inconvenience. Repetition creates new connections in your nervous system that can sometimes change things for good – or bad – depending on how you feel about it.

My point here is if you want to make a change one way or the other you need to recognize what that pattern is and acknowledge it. Once you identify what it is, if it is a negative thing in your life you want to change you can apply something towards it. Adjust it to something positive and keep reinforcing why you’re doing the thing you have changed.

Two: Adjust Slowly

We are also filled with a society of Type A personalities. People who are all in on whatever they are going to do and give it 100% of their effort. This is often a good quality, unless you are trying to make a permanent change.

As much as we would like to think it does, your brain and nervous system do not adjust quickly. Yes, there are mechanisms in place so that if you have to make a sudden decision or move your body quickly then you are able to, but then there is always a recovery period where your nervous system needs to rest. Think of it like almost getting into an accident and the adrenaline rush, then the subsequent crash afterwards.

My advice to people is always to adjust one thing, make it a proper change and then adjust something else. Don’t try to do three or four things at once. It’s kind of like dating. If you are involved with three or four people at the same time it becomes an exhausting juggling act where you’re like the cat with paws on several mice. Then you go after one more and all the mice escape.

Instead, work on one thing for a period of time until you’re confident it is solid and you’re able to have it as a permanent part of your routine. Then find something else and add on. This should ideally be something small – not big. Something that you will barely even notice like adding in a good food to increase your fibre or making a point of going to bed and getting up at the same time daily.

As an example, I recently got a client to start consistently stretching. How? We started with five minutes per day accountable. Ten stretches for thirty seconds each. Once that was good, we expanded the SAME routine to forty and then forty-five seconds and added some more one stretch at a time. But this took a period of weeks, not days. Now it is a part of his lifestyle, stretching ten minutes a day. The next step is taking on ten minutes of exercise on his own once a week.

Whether it’s five minutes or half an hour, it doesn’t really matter. Positive change is positive change. But if I’d tried to give him ten minutes per day right away plus a workout on his own it wouldn’t have worked. Slower adjustments bring on consistency, which yields results every time. Let me repeat that: Consistency yields results. Find a way to adjust slowly so that you can maintain consistency.

Three: WAIT and be patient

I tell my kids all the time when they are learning something new, just be patient and keep practicing. As adults somehow we forget this philosophy. Blame can also fall on our instant gratification society of course where we are marketed to by people who claim we can change overnight and make a massive change.

Think about examples of failure with rapid change in the fitness world. Biggest Loser? 90% gain the weight back. Those ads in magazines where they claim you can be shredded in weeks. Diving into a Crossfit box or group exercise program? Most people injure themselves quickly and never go back. Starvation fad diets. Supplements that waste your money all in the name of trying to make things go faster.

If people would just be patient and adjust things as I’ve discussed, you can see a big change. It just takes time. Another client recently eliminated the cream and sugar from his coffee and dropped seven pounds in a couple of months. I’ve had people lose ten pounds in the same time just by cutting out alcohol. Increasing your bench press is done two pounds at a time, not twenty all at once. Trying to do things fast is a road to either setback or failure.

When I first talk to someone, I try to get them to think long term. Like a year long term, and where they want to try to be. Not six weeks. Not two months. I’m not saying you can’t make a change in six weeks – you can make a massive one – but if you are only thinking about that six weeks you’re missing the bigger picture. Then plan accordingly for whatever goal you have. This should be broken down into smaller chunks to make it manageable with smaller goals along the way.

This process is why people hire professional coaches. To have someone else think about the big picture and what they are doing in broad strokes, then dialing down to explain small steps that will work. And it should be someone who has examples of people they have successfully helped, not just themselves.

And again, give it time. Make note of the little changes that you see or feel, or even comments that people make around you. Think about how much better you’re sleeping, feeling inside or moving. Every marathon runner I’ve ever met began with a run around the block.

I hope this article gives you some perspective and tools towards lasting change. If you truly want to do something positive, take the time to recognize, adjust slowly and wait. The RAW method works if you implement it properly. Just take it one step at a time.

If you’d like to talk further about what it takes to change, feel free to reach out and have a conversation with me. I’ve been helping people for years find out what it takes and put together a proper plan to achieve positive things.

Until next time!

Let your Personality Guide your Fitness

Over the years I’ve dealt with probably several hundred people and helped guide them towards their fitness goals.  What many people don’t know is that my background is in psychology, and I’m fascinated with how people think.

One aspect of goal setting that many people forget about when it comes to creating a goal is really digging deep into their personality type.  We all have different aspects to our personality depending on several factors.  These personality traits can either set you up for success in life or take away from it because you’ll always feel like you’re forcing a square peg into a round hole if you don’t.

As an example, three years ago I was offered an office job temporarily during the federal election.  I found quickly after a couple of weeks that sitting at a desk all day in an office environment made me want to dig my eyes out of my head with a rusty fork.  The work was easy for me, but I much prefer being on my feet, teaching and coaching different situations and people and having a fluid schedule.  This is just part of who I am.  The temporary job just reinforced it to me.

As an aside, I’ve never understood people who are miserable at their jobs just to take a paycheck home.  If you don’t like your situation, just change it – it’s not as hard as you think.  But I digress…

So how does this apply to fitness?  There’s a few ways you can analyze your personality and make it work for you fitness wise as well.  Here’s a couple of key questions to ask yourself when it comes to creating a strategy towards fitness:

Are you a Group Person or an Individual? 

What sports did you play as a kid?  Were you a hockey or basketball star or did you prefer golf or racquet sports?  Most people are either team sports oriented or individual sport oriented.  Someone who is team sport oriented likes meshing with and depending on other people to perform their activity.  An individual person might be part of a team still, but prefer that their performance relies on their own effort and skill.

This tends to also work in adulthood.  Individual sport people usually will prefer the same environment.   This might mean you join a running group, golf with a couple of others, play a racquet sport or cycle alone.  Team sport people will be more likely to join a league or team for things that require multiple people.

Let’s translate that to the gym.  An individual person likely would prefer something like simply lifting weights alone – even at home.  They don’t have to have another person relying on them to get things done.  A team person would likely prefer showing up to a yoga class with a bunch of people they know or doing anything with a bunch of others.

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Can you Focus or are you a Multi-Tasker? 

Some people can sit down and complete a grueling task that takes all day and enjoy it, checking off a list one thing at a time.  Others (like me) prefer constant changes and stimulation and can have several projects on the go at the same time.

The former person will prefer to walk into a gym with a defined plan.  Something to follow and check off parts as they go and likely not adjust it.  The latter will be more of a type that will adjust a plan on the fly if they have one, or try different types of classes in the same week for variety even if they might not be guiding towards anything specific.

A focused person would set one or two goals in a year and work diligently towards them like a marathon or a large event like a tournament or championship.  A multi-tasker might have ten goals and only accomplish five of them and be fine with that.

Your most successful champion athletes are typically the focused ones who can work on one goal for long periods of time and follow a plan – but it’s okay to admit that you aren’t that type of person.  If you find that you can’t follow a focused plan for more than a couple of months, admit that to yourself and find a way to tweak things so that you are working on a couple of things at once.  Triathletes are excellent multi-taskers (which is probably why I liked it too!).

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Do you Want to Show Off or are you Self-Fulfilled? 

This is where I might get criticized a bit but hear me out.  We all have a certain amount of narcissism within us.  Some more than others.  When you are digging deep you really need to ask yourself if you’re doing the event to be able to brag to your friends or show off to others, or simply for accomplishing a goal and feeling good about it yourself.

Making an amazing golf shot brings a good feeling to people – but you’re by yourself, as does making an amazing play on a soccer field so people will cheer for you.  Ask yourself if you don’t care about a trophy but want to have an amazing sense of accomplishment like a long adventure race or a marathon – or if you want to be carried off the field on the shoulders of your team mates or have your picture in a magazine so you can display it all over social media.

Again, how does this translate to the gym?  Maybe someone who wants to show their skills would be a great group fitness instructor.  Or join a Crossfit gym where they can write their accomplishments on a board and have people cheering them on at competitions.  Self-fulfilled people might not even need a gym and be happy just working out at home.

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Ask Yourself These Questions    

This process will go a long way towards making sure that you are doing something that you will continue with in the fitness world.  As we all know, the key to success is one main thing – consistency.  Creating an environment where you will feel your best and keep going constantly will bring you the greatest success with your goals.

Be honest with yourself as well.  It is easy to program things based on what we think others might think of us.  Get over it.  Focus on what you enjoy and really stay true to yourself – and this can apply to many areas of life, not just fitness.

If you have any questions or enjoyed this please like, share and retweet away!  I appreciate any and all feedback and hope that you continue in the best way towards your fitness journey.

Patience Isn’t Just a Virtue When You’re Injured.

Recently because I’m a football fan I’ve been reading about recovery of the quarterback of the Indianapolis Colts.  His name is Andrew Luck and he’s a professional athlete who was the next up and coming superstar in the league.

That is, until he badly tore the labrum in his shoulder and had to have surgery.  The whole thing was mismanaged by his medical staff and it’s a long story, but the point of the whole thing is this:  He did not take a snap last football season and has been out of football for over a year due to rehab.

This is a professional athlete with access to daily physio, the best surgeons in the game and things like stem cell treatments, and he still has not thrown a football in over a year.  A year.  This is a guy who throws a football for a living and he’s not doing it to let his injury recover for a YEAR.

I’ll ask you a simple question:  if he’s taking that long to recover with access to all of those resources, what makes you think that you can recover from an injury any faster?

Typical labrum tear surgery recovery is 3-4 months but can easily stretch into 6-9 months if things aren’t dealt with properly.

Over the years I’ve dealt with hundreds of injuries.  One thing that I really try to get across to my clients is that if you are hurt, you need to give your body time to heal and recover from whatever it is.  This takes TIME.  Usually a period of weeks if not months.  For some reason my Type A people seem to think that if they just baby a problem for a couple of weeks and then go right back into doing whatever they were doing before they will be fine.

Or even worse, they do physio but keep on doing the same activity that caused the injury in the first place and expect to recover.  I had an example of that just last week and when I pointed it out to my client that not stopping the activity meant it would just get worse again she was for some reason completely dumbfounded.

Does this make sense?

The general guidelines for minor injuries is 4-6 weeks.  More severe ones are 6-12 weeks.  Surgery is anywhere from 3-6 months at LEAST depending on the issue.

My main point is this:  we need to exercise patience as a society when it comes to our bodies.

Whether it comes to recovering from an injury, things like weight loss or achieving a goal like running a marathon, you need to exercise patience to succeed.

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Are you acting smart, or making things worse by rushing the process?

Setting a goal for recovery is just like any other goal – there is a timeline and a process involved.  Sometimes it means not moving anything for a couple of weeks.  Sometimes it is moving just a little bit as much as you can as frequently as you can to help the healing process.  It can be frustrating and feel like it’s taking forever.  But you have a long time to achieve whatever it is you’re trying to do.

If you want to be active and healthy for a lifetime, then taking six months to recover from an injury might represent less than 1% of your athletic or active life over a span of fifty years.  You’re not missing anything by taking that time to make sure that whatever happened doesn’t happen again.

Be patient now, be consistent and give it time and you will succeed in your recovery.  Rush back into activity and have a setback or make the situation worse and suddenly a six-week process becomes six months.

If an NFL player can not touch a football for a year, you can wait three months to rehab from surgery.  Don’t think that your body or recovery process is any different.  Patience and consistency wil get you results every time.

If you liked this article, feel free to share it on social media, contact me via Facebook or LinkedIn or email me directly with any inquires.

Rules of the Body

Jill Miller, who is the inventor of a program called Yoga Tune Up, recently revealed on her blog about a month ago that she needs a total hip replacement.  At the age of 45.  Now, she has been absolutely instrumental in helping many, many people discover a modality that can really help irritated tissue and brought it to the main stream.  The story, however is what I want to bring your attention to today.

What was telling about her first blog post, which you can find HERE (and I’ll link to the second part HERE) is that she felt nagging pain not only for most of her life but for the past seven years.  Until recently she didn’t bother to have it looked at because she was worried about surgery for personal reasons.  That’s fine.

This is one of the most respected and knowledgeable (from an anatomy standpoint) body teachers IN THE WORLD and even she ignored her symptoms.  We all do it, from your fellow office worker to high level athletes who want to keep competing.

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This is all too common with athletes.

“I’m okay, I just need to stretch.”  “I’ll start using my therapy ball.”  “I’ll take a couple of weeks off from running and everything will be fine.”  And then we go back to doing the same thing that caused the problem in the first place and are suddenly surprised when the issue comes back – and worse.

Just this week another client of mine’s husband after almost a year of pain finally decided to go to the doctor and get checked because his knee wouldn’t stop failing and buckling.  My prediction is either a torn ACL or a severely torn meniscus (or both).  The problem is that he’s been walking around on it for the better part of a year without any treatment or attention, and likely it’s gotten a lot worse.  This might mean that something that could have been helped with therapy before might need surgery now.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again:

Your body isn’t stupid.

Pain, collapse, restricted range is a signal that something is wrong.

The sooner you figure it out and fix it the better off long term you will be.

If you have water coming into your basement, you figure out where it is coming from and plug the leak.  You don’t sit there and wait for it to subside, clean it up and then wait for it to happen again.  Mold sets in.  The leak might get bigger.  Other things can come into play that make a simple leak a catastrophe.  Your body is no different.

When your body is subjected to stress, it responds to it.  This can result in either stronger muscles, or deterioration and loss of integrity.  A large part of my job is finding out the perfect balance between just enough and too much load, stress or torque on joints.  You need to consider your body as a whole and what loads it is being subjected to daily, weekly and annually to really figure this out.

And in case you’re wondering, sitting is a load.  Driving is a load.  Weight training is a load.  Yoga is a load.  I remember when I sat through the Yoga Tune Up course (I did not certify because I have no desire to be a yoga instructor) and a room full of body practitioners looked at me like I had two heads when I suggested that yoga poses – especially extreme ones – are still heavy forces through joints.  They are, in case you’re wondering.  Jill Miller says that herself in her articles.  Years ago I wrote a post about why a downward dog is downright dangerous for most people.  It’s HERE.

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Is this good for your hip socket?

One big fundamental rule I teach my clients is that they should walk out of a workout feeling better – not worse.  This means they are far more likely to have had an appropriate level of stimulus and will have a better long-term response.  They won’t get worse, they will get better.  Isn’t that the whole idea?

The point of this is that nobody is invulnerable to the rules of the body, even people who have spent their whole life practicing something that is supposedly therapeutic.  Don’t assume that if you have a problem that things like stretching and pounding yourself with a yoga ball is the answer.  It might just make things worse over time.  Seek out someone who knows the rules of the body and can identify a proper strategy to bring your body back into balance and stop overloading tissue.

So the next time you work out, try taking a step back.  Are you pushing through pain?  Have you had a problem for a while and have been ignoring it?  Take a really close stock and tell yourself that you should probably get that taken care of before subjecting your body to even more stress.

Because nobody wants a hip replacement at the age of 45.  At least I don’t.

Feel free to message me or find me on social media if you have something you would like to identify or a question.  Injuries and providing solutions are what I deal with every day.